Gypsytoes or Stickytoes


This says it all about our lives on Ometepe Island. We want the best of all worlds. How does one decide to stay or go? Is it possible to have Gypsytoes and Stickytoes  together? If so, how does that work?

Here are some of our considerations in deciding to stay or go.

Financial

 

We grow a lot of our fruits and vegetables.

In 2016, we traveled to Colombia, Fiji, New Zealand, Las Vegas, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania. We accounted for all of our expenses and income for 2016, and we actually saved money and came out ahead when we balanced income vs expenses.  We own two homes, we have no mortgages and no expenses for our home in the states. Our trusted friends live in our house, collect our mail, and they even took care of our old cat, Tokyo, until she passed away this year. The small amount of rent goes into a special account which we use to pay our property taxes, rental insurance, and for repairs on the house.

If we were to sell our house on Ometepe Island, we would be free to travel the world, but it would come with a price. We would continue to live only on our monthly income, and try not to dip into our savings, yet it would be difficult because we would have to pay a monthly rental fee, which we don’t have to now. Traveling is expensive. We aren’t backpackers anymore, and we like to stay in Airbnbs throughout the world. It is doable, but will take some work to stay within our budget.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Textures of Tzintzuntzan


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Texture.

Tzintzuntzan was the capital of the Purépecha Empire when the Spanish arrived in 1522. Situated on Lake Pátzcuaro, Mexico the character of the indigenous people is clear in every archeological remnant and rock of this fascinating archeological site.

The main attraction is the five yácatas or semi-circular pyramids that are well organized and face out over the lake area.
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Not my Circus! Not My Monkeys!


I watched the talking heads on CNN the other night and suddenly realized that I was screaming at the TV, “Not my circus! Not my monkeys!”  When my anxiety decreased, I became aware that these two simple phrases have a lot of meaning in my life lately. Then, I burst out laughing.

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Out of Nicaragua


“One does not travel by plane. One is merely sent, like a parcel.” ― Karen Blixen

We’ve been out of Nicaragua for three months. It is the longest time we have been away in the seven years that we have permanently lived here. Three countries, 16 airplanes, two trains, three ferries, two rental cars, too many buses to count, and one eye operation later…we are finally home!

My impressions of the countries we visited are dependent on many factors such as economic, political, climate, and most important…the people we met from all walks of life. In every country we visit we ask,”Could we live here?” The answer often surprises us. Yet, it helps us to form lasting impressions of the country.

Could we live in Cuba?

Foremost, we are grateful we had the opportunity to visit Cuba in March before Trump’s Cuba policy redefined “good” U.S. tourism. We are and always will be independent travelers. In most packaged tours and cruises, you see what the tour companies want you to see…predictable, expensive, and unsustainable tourism. Instead, we like to explore as detectives searching for clues about why people live as they do, what the real culture is like, and what makes a country tick.

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Travel Can Be Exhausting


We have been traveling since March…three countries…eleven airplanes…two hotels…four Airbnbs…two casa particulars…one train…too many buses and taxis to count…one boat…one rental car…and stayed in two houses ( our house and our son’s house). We still have seven airplanes booked…one eye operation…two hotels…one rental car…a taxi…a ferry…and one tuk tuk before we arrive home on Ometepe Island.

Travel.Is.Exhausting.

We are in Yosemite National Park visiting our son, who is an interpretive naturalist. No matter how many times we visit, the beauty of this park awes and inspires me. Also, it is a perfect place to hike and enjoy the amazing scenery.

The waterfalls gush with the icy snow melt. I have never seen so much water in Yosemite before. Booming…thunderous water crashes and sprays all around us.

Wildflowers bloom…vivid spring green transforms the valley…there is no better place to be than with my two favorite men.

We will be busy for the next two weeks. I plan on going to all of Cory’s programs like the astronomy program called Starry Skies, the nature stroll, the historical Ahwahnee Hotel, and the night prowl to look for Yosemite’s night creatures. Then I want to take the photography and watercolor classes, as well as hike everyday.

I wont be posting much until we return to Ometepe Island in June, and then it will depend on how my eye surgery goes. Wish me luck. I have many beautiful sights yet to see in this incredible world of ours.

Other than Humans in Cuba and Mexico


“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” ~Mahatma Gandhi

I take too many photographs when I travel. That’s the truth! Yet, when I review the photos I take, they all tell a story than I will remember. Cuba and Mexico had delightful birds, dogs, cats, reptiles, and other creatures. Surprisingly, they all appeared to be in good health and well fed…not like the animals we see in Nicaragua.

The birds of Cuba sang lovely Cuban melodies.

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Lasting Impressions of Cuba


“Anarchy is like custard cooking over a flame; it has to be constantly stirred or it sticks and gets heavy, like government.” ― Tom Robbins, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues

Anarchism as a social movement in Cuba held much promise for the working class during the 19th and 20th centuries. I won’t go into the sordid details, you can read the history here Anarchism in Cuba.

Yet, what I would like to discuss are my lasting impressions of Cuba. First, Che is everywhere. Forty-five years after the death of Ernesto “Che” Guevara — the Argentine doctor who led the 1959 Cuban Revolution alongside Fidel Castro — his portrait is the most reproduced image in Cuba.

His face appears repeatedly on murals, water tanks, billboards, and even plates, t-shirts, coffee mugs, beach towels, and bikinis. While extraordinarily popular as a figure of revolution where children are taught to see him as a hero from a very young age, his image is used to promote commercialism in Cuba. My impression is that he has become a pattern and a design to sell to tourists, and I think they have gone too far and misrepresented Che. Would you buy a bikini with Che’s face on the butt of a bikini bottom?

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Wanderlust: A belly aching fire


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Wanderlust.

I know some of my readers wonder why I include posts about our travels to other countries besides Nicaragua. After all, my blog is supposed to be about living in Nicaragua.

Yet, my gypsytoes ache for travel. Because we live in a country where the cost of living is low, we can afford to travel, especially during the most brutal and oppressive heat of March through May.

Currently, we are in the mountains in Patzcuaro, Mexico. We were in Cuba in March and are headed to the states next week for the month of May. No matter where our wanderlust takes us, it is always great to go back home!

“The Wanderlust has got me… by the belly aching fire”
― Robert W. Service, Rhymes of a Rolling Stone

Cuba

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Cuba is More than Havana


“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”
― John Muir

Walking through a small art gallery in Havana, I became mesmerized by this painting. Is this in Cuba? I have to go there! As we discovered, it was Viñales and we visited after we left Havana.

Ron and I both enjoy traveling through cities, but we are really country people at heart and prefer mountains and lakes to oceans and cities. We read that Viñales is the gateway to the Sierra de los Organos Mountains and the Viñales Valley. The valley’s steep limestone hills, called mogotes, draw many rock climbers. We hoped to report excellent climbing conditions to our son Cory, who is a rock climber.

The Viñales Valley offers Cuba’s best hiking, caving, rock climbing, horseback riding, and cycling. Just down a hill from our casa particular, we entered a magical world with trails leading in all directions. The rights to roam and climb are relaxed in this part of the world, so we were free to explore as we tramped under fences, through farmers’ tobacco fields, and climbed steep mogotes to view mystical vistas.

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Part II: Renting a Guagua or Waawaa We Go!


Life is similar to a bus ride, or in the case of Sandy’s Cuban family, a guagua ride. (pronounced waa waa)
The journey began when Sandy rented a guagua to take us to Havana for an evening of entertainment. You see, her extended family is so large and no one owns a car, so it was impossible to treat them to an evening of fun in Havana without renting a guagua.

Thirty dollars bought Sandy an evening with a guagua driver and enough room for the entire community to go to Havana to watch the cannon ceremony.

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