Weekly Photo Challenge: A Motion Filled Walk on Corn Island


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Motion. Join me in a windy motion filled walk on Corn Island.

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair.” ~Kalil Gibran, The Prophet
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“Words are wind.” George R.R. Martin
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Weekly Photo Challenge: The Early Bird Gets the Mango


The weekly photo challenge is Early Bird. Living in Nicaragua, we’ve become accustomed to rising early…sometimes as early as 4:30 am. All of the action occurs early in the morning in Nicaragua…the earlier the better because the afternoons are reserved for long siestas in the tropical heat.

If you are an early bird, you will probably see… the parrot getting the first ripe mango
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Once Afloat


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Afloat. I am fascinated by what was once afloat and then drifted slowly to shore. I could be a beachcomber. I am a beachcomber because you’d be surprised at what I salvage from things once afloat!

I wanted to bring this driftwood back to Ometepe Island from the Corn Islands. It looks like a bear just coming out of hibernation. Too bad the airline restricts us to 40 lbs. This piece that was once afloat would make a great addition to my flower garden.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: A Fleeting Life


“There is no tomorrow..it is always today. Tomorrow is the fleeting and minute distance..between hope & once more..once again!”
― Victoria June

 

The Weekly Photo Challenge is ephemeral. Photography reminds me of life. You have to catch it when you can, for it is fleeting and illusive.

In the adult stage, a butterfly lives approximately 3-4 weeks and the female only mates once in her lifetime. I imagine that observing mating butterflies is a short-lived experience, so I had to catch it quickly.

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Reflections on Corn Island


“Life is like facing two mirrors at each other: there is no beginning, there is no end. Just the beauty within the reflected infinity”
― Michael Biondi

 

Last week was our second time to fly to the Corn Islands. We were hoping to visit Little Corn Island this time, but it wasn’t in the cards. The winds were ferocious and it rained on and off all week making the thoughts of a long panga ride to Little Corn Island one big vomit fest. I opted out of that adventure, and a good thing I did, because we heard that a huge wave attacked a man riding in the front of the panga. He was thrown to the back of the panga…breaking his back!!! He had to be flown to Managua by helicopter.

We stayed with friends who have a beautiful house on Big Corn Island. Late one afternoon, we took them to Martha’s Restaurant for dinner and I walked around a pond where I took these reflections of the trees in the water.

Did you ever wonder if the person in a puddle is real, and you are just a reflection of her? That was one of many strange reflections I had as I peered into the water.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Walls of War


The weekly photo challenge is wall. Nicaragua abounds with walls of war, remembrances of their defense of personal rights, freedom, and dignity. Honoring their Nicaraguan heroes is especially clear on the walls in the cities.

“The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.” ― G.K. Chesterton
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The Small Fly on the Solentiname Islands


“There is a magnificent, beautiful, wonderful painting in front of you! It is intricate, detailed, a painstaking labor of devotion and love! The colors are like no other, they swim and leap, they trickle and embellish! And yet you choose to fixate your eyes on the small fly which has landed on it! Why do you do such a thing?”
― C. JoyBell C.

 

Tito told me of the small fly named Envy, that is creating cracks in the sidewalks along the San Fernando Island in the Solentiname Archipelago. I wanted to know if the sidewalks in the Solentiname Islands connected the people like the sidewalks in El Castillo. What I discovered was somewhat surprising, yet understanding the jealous nature of many Nicaraguans, I gained a new appreciation for Tito, the grandson of a local businesswoman on San Fernando Island. Tito has several plans to reconnect the people and mend the cracks in the meandering sidewalks.

I won’t go into the history of the Solentiname Islands, so check out this descriptive article In Lush Nicaragua,Legacy of a Priest for more information. Tito is the grandson of Ms. Guevara Silva, the owner of the historic Albergue Celentiname Inn, where we stayed.

We arrived at the Malecón de San Carlos to wait for the daily boat to the Solentiname Islands. Finding a boat schedule online was difficult, but a captain at the Malecón reassured us that there was a daily boat which left at 3:00pm for the archipelago and returned to San Carlos at 9:00 am.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: An Artist’s Reward


The weekly photo challenge is: Reward

The Solentiname Islands offer a communal space for artistic expression and spiritual discovery. In 1965, Ernesto Cardenal, a Nicaraguan priest and now-famous poet, established a religious community on the Solentiname Islands.

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Rollin’ Rollin’ Rollin’ on the River


If you come down to the River
Bet you’re gonna find some people who live
You don’t have to worry ’cause you have no money
People on the river are happy to give~ Proud Mary sung by Tina Turner

 

Every now and then, I kind of like to do things nice and easy. Rollin’ on the Rio San Juan was one of those nice and easy kind of days. However, life on the river was not always tranquil. What a deep and rough history this river has: pirates, slave traders, William Walker, Cornelius Vanderbilt; cannons, forts, rapids, and crocodiles the size of dugout canoes.

Yet, embarking on our three-hour journey meandering down the olive-green waters of the Rio San Juan, I felt like an explorer perched on the edge of discovering a new way of life…a much slower-paced life…one in harmony with the rhythm and beat of the waves gently lapping the shore in the wake of our long, flat-bottomed panga.

What discoveries lie ahead? Will we find human imprints? Join me as we leave the sliver of civilization known as San Carlos, and glide slowly down the river into the depths of the jungle. Turn up the music! We’re rollin’ on the river Tina Turner style.

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It’s the Journey That Matters: Getting to the Rio San Juan


“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”
― Ernest Hemingway

 

Rolling down the Rio San Juan has been on our bucket list for years. However, having an end to journey toward was not our greatest reward. Instead, the journey itself was our fringe benefit because getting there was half the fun.

Oh the convenience of living beside a small airport! We walked our sandy volcanic path to the airport on a Thursday afternoon and caught a 15 minute flight to San Carlos, Nicaragua. We booked with La Costeña online. Make sure you book early because the planes seat 12 people. At a cost of $85 round trip per person, we felt like it was a bargain, if only for the convenience of walking to and from our house.

And we were off!  We ascended over the patchwork of fields, quaint red tin roofs, and the calm Lake Cocibolca.
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