Weekly Photo Challenge: Some Days You Just Gotta Laugh


The Weekly Photo Challenge is: Today Was a Good Day.

Although the WordPress gang wanted us to try their new Mesh program for a gallery of our photos, it was so frustrating that I gave up and instead found photos that made me laugh today.

You never know what you will find on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua.  The photos prove that in the land of the not quite right, you gotta laugh.  These photos were taken last week. So, for your entertainment today, I hope you have a few chuckles after viewing my photos.

How do you entertain the taxi driver’s two children on a long ride to Managua? You take goofy photos with your iPad.
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Master Craftsmen in Nicaragua


 “You can either be a victim of the world or an adventurer in search of treasure. It all depends on how you view your life.”
― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

I am an adventurer always in search of treasure. The Pre-Columbian pottery shards and pieces I find on my daily walks along the beach sit in piles on my bookcase and on my porch forever gathering dirt and dust and harboring tiny colonies of insects. Yet, more than protecting my pottery, I found a greater treasure in the master craftsmen in Nicaragua.

The time was long overdue to protect my treasures! I designed a wooden display cabinet, then I had to find a master woodworker to build the cabinet to my specifications. Marina recommended Herman, her door maker. When I saw the quality of his work, I knew he would be perfect.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Beneath My Feet in Nicaragua


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Beneath Your Feet.

Well, the good news is that I am posting pictures of beautiful things I find beneath my feet in Nicaragua. I could be posting photos of cow manure, dead squished Cane toads, blown-out flip-flops, or the pink and green plastic bags ( Nicaraguan flowers) all over the roads. Instead, I choose to overlook the trash and emphasize the beauty. :-)

A board walk under my feet on Corn Island, Nicaragua.
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Let’s Get Real about Time Management in Nicaragua


All that really belongs to us is time; even he who has nothing else has that. ~Baltasar Gracian

Living in Nicaragua requires a different mindset of time management. I used to pride myself in the ability to plan and control how I spent the hours in my day to effectively accomplish my goals. I had mastered the skills of planning for the future. setting goals, prioritizing tasks, and monitoring where the time goes. THEN…I moved to Nicaragua where mañana could mean today, tomorrow, sometime in the distant future, or never… where I am constantly reminded to slow down and be present. What I’ve learned about time management in Nicaragua may surprise you. It’s not all bad.

Let’s get real about time management in Nicaragua.

How many times have you been left hanging?

How many times have you been left hanging?

 

1. Most Nicaraguans are better at single-tasking, than multi-tasking.

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My Obituary for Pierre Doris Maltais


Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 7.50.11 AM Pierre Doris Maltais was born June 27, 1937 in East Angus Quebec, married in 1961, and had three children. He died in July, 2015 in Granada, Nicaragua.

Known to many as Norman William, Brother Maolinn Tiam, Man, Abi, Indio, and numerous other aliases, he was revered by unsuspecting victims and followers of the Cult Ecoovie, and hated by those who were knowledgeable of his evil past.

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How Does Your Dragon Fruit Grow?


Dragon Fruit or Pitaya, as it is called in Nicaragua, is the most heavenly fruit I know. The exact origin of this amazing cactus is unknown, but it is native to the jungles of Central America and grows well in Nicaragua. The Pitaya cactus is a prolific climber, using aerial roots to propel itself higher and farther along whatever paths it can find to reach lengths of up to 20 feet or more.

We’ve been growing Pitaya for several years, and this year the Pitaya cactus treated us to an amazing sight…our first buds and the night-blooming flowers.
IMG_8576After a rain about two weeks ago, I photographed several of our Pitaya buds. They were only budding on the Pitaya cactus that received full sun.
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Weekly Photo Challenge: I Spy Eyes Close Up


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Close Up. I wandered around my house today shooting close-ups of eyes.

Queenie says, “I see it is an in-my-face kind of day.”
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After the Rain: Did you know that….?


It’s the rainy season in Nicaragua. After the all day rain yesterday, I walked around our property to see how the people, plants, and insects reacted.  Did you know that…?

Butterflies dart into protective vegetation and scramble beneath leaves when dark skies, strong winds, and the first raindrops signal an imminent storm. Can you imagine weighing about 500 milligrams with a massive 70 milligram raindrop pelting you? It would be like trying to dodge a water balloon with twice the mass of a bowling ball.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Books as Symbols


The weekly photo challenge is symbol.

 

Symbols are stories. Symbols are pictures, or items, or ideas that represent something else. Human beings attach such importance and meaning to symbols that they can inspire hope. ~Lia Habel

 

I can think of no better symbol of hope than a book. When I opened the La Paloma Elementary School Library in my community, I had hopes of instilling a joy of reading in a culture that lacks understanding of books. It has grown beyond my expectations!

 

“There are many little ways to enlarge your world.  Love of books is the best of all.” – Jacqueline Kennedy
spanish books“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go.”— Dr. Seuss, “I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!”
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Guess Who Came to Dinner?


doctorsMarina was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease over two years ago. Her journey through this condition led her to a public healthcare surgeon in Managua, who removed her diseased thyroid in two operations a year apart. Gloria, her daughter, brought the diseased thyroid home in a plastic cup for all to see before taking it to a private clinic for a biopsy report.

I shook my head in disbelief.

What kind of pubic health system allows patients to bring a diseased body part home, then asks them to pay a private clinic for a biopsy report?

For Ron’s birthday, we decided to make a North American meal for 15 of our Nicaraguan friends and neighbors. Marina said, “My surgeon and his family are vacationing at my house for a week. Can they come, too?”

“Of course,” I replied. Again, I shook my head in disbelief.

Why would a surgeon want to spend his vacation in a humble abode of a patient instead of a fancy hotel? “Aren’t all doctors rich?” I asked Marina.

What I learned about the public healthcare system in Nicaragua will surprise you.

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