Weekly Photo Challenge: Textures of Tzintzuntzan


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Texture.

Tzintzuntzan was the capital of the Purépecha Empire when the Spanish arrived in 1522. Situated on Lake Pátzcuaro, Mexico the character of the indigenous people is clear in every archeological remnant and rock of this fascinating archeological site.

The main attraction is the five yácatas or semi-circular pyramids that are well organized and face out over the lake area.
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Life is Fleeting


The Weekly Photo Challenge is transient. 

Yesterday, I traveled to Managua on the mainland, and caught a glimpse of the clouds surrounding our island volcano. It was stunning, as if our sleeping beauty was hovering in air. It reminded me how fleeting our lives on this glorious planet are.
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Out of Nicaragua


“One does not travel by plane. One is merely sent, like a parcel.” ― Karen Blixen

We’ve been out of Nicaragua for three months. It is the longest time we have been away in the seven years that we have permanently lived here. Three countries, 16 airplanes, two trains, three ferries, two rental cars, too many buses to count, and one eye operation later…we are finally home!

My impressions of the countries we visited are dependent on many factors such as economic, political, climate, and most important…the people we met from all walks of life. In every country we visit we ask,”Could we live here?” The answer often surprises us. Yet, it helps us to form lasting impressions of the country.

Could we live in Cuba?

Foremost, we are grateful we had the opportunity to visit Cuba in March before Trump’s Cuba policy redefined “good” U.S. tourism. We are and always will be independent travelers. In most packaged tours and cruises, you see what the tour companies want you to see…predictable, expensive, and unsustainable tourism. Instead, we like to explore as detectives searching for clues about why people live as they do, what the real culture is like, and what makes a country tick.

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My Love Affair with International Markets


Everywhere we travel, the first thing I look for is the local market. Local markets are bursting with heritage breeds and heirloom varieties of vegetables, fruits and other mysterious food items known only to the locals. Walking through a local market helps me to connect with the community’s roots.

Patzcuaro, Mexico had an open air market bursting with everything imaginable. Join me in a walk through the market. Fruits galore! We found many of the same fruits that we have in Nicaragua, only slightly different varieties such as the mangoes. Fresh strawberries…mounds and hills of them all over the market. It was such a treat to buy fresh strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries daily.

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Other than Humans in Cuba and Mexico


“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” ~Mahatma Gandhi

I take too many photographs when I travel. That’s the truth! Yet, when I review the photos I take, they all tell a story than I will remember. Cuba and Mexico had delightful birds, dogs, cats, reptiles, and other creatures. Surprisingly, they all appeared to be in good health and well fed…not like the animals we see in Nicaragua.

The birds of Cuba sang lovely Cuban melodies.

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Cultural Anthropology: Semana Santa in Mexico


“It may be in the cultural particularities of people — in their oddities — that some of the most instructive revelations of what it is to be generically human are to be found.”
― Clifford Geertz

 

The cultural peculiarities of our humanness, especially when studying religions of the world, fascinate me. Mexico has many virgins, and Dolores or Our Lady of Sorrows is particularly intriguing to me.

Although Dolores is an advocation of the Virgin Mary, she represents the sorrows of the mother of Jesus, and is usually depicted with seven daggers piercing her heart, which represent the sorrows all mothers go through when losing a child.

The altars are erected on the streets the Friday before the beginning of Holy Week. Called the Friday of Sorrows, the symbols on the altars help the faithful share her pain and grief, and remind them of the great sacrifice Mary made to become the mother of martyrs.

In Patzcuaro, Mexico, where we are enjoying refreshing highland weather for the month of April, I watched the construction of the shrines, processions, and reenactments of the crucifixion of Jesus, with a healthy dose of skepticism, yet awe for the pageantry.

From the perspective of a cultural anthropologist…as I like to call myself,  I questioned everything, as well as reflected on the religious traditions, how they originated, and their significance to their faithful followers.

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Travel Theme: Life is like a Box of Crayons


“Life is like a box of crayons. Most people are the 8 color boxes, but what you’re really looking for are the 64 color boxes with the sharpeners on the back. I fancy myself to be a 64 color box, though I’ve got a few missing. It’s okay though, because I’ve got some more vibrant colors like periwinkle at my disposal. I have a bit of a problem though in that I can only meet the 8 color boxes. Does anyone else have that problem? I mean there are so many different colors of life, of feeling, of articulation. So when I meet someone who’s an 8 color type…I’m like, hey girl, Magenta! and she’s like, oh, you mean purple! and she goes off on her purple thing, and I’m like, no I want Magenta!”
― John Mayer

I love this quote. 🙂 Ailsa’s travel theme this week is colorful. So, I’m digging through the 64 color box for my most colorful travel photos.

Lourdita and Julio waiting for the party to begin in Nicaragua.
Lourdita and Julio

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Travel Theme: Numbers


“[When asked why are numbers beautiful?]

“It’s like asking why is Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony beautiful. If you don’t see why, someone can’t tell you. I know numbers are beautiful. If they aren’t beautiful, nothing is.”
― Paul Erdős

Weighing fruits in a market in Mexico
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I’m counting on you to continue! More numbers ahead.

If I Were a Butterfly for a Day


“Life is short. If you doubt me, ask a butterfly. Their average life span is a mere five to fourteen days.” ~ Ellen DeGeneres

I made my bucket list when I was 21 years old. I had a Nothing Journal ( if you are a Baby Boomer, you may remember the Nothing Journals) where I would sketch my longings and desires. Included in my sketches:
1.   A cabin in the woods….check
2.   A loving heart…check
3.   A marriage certificate…check (We’ve been married 37 38 years)
4.   A backpacking trip and travel, travel, travel…check
5.   An advanced degree…check
6.   Children…check
7.   A peace sign…still working on that one
8.   A tropical island…check
9.   A Datsun Z…never got that car
10. A St. Bernard…never got a St.Bernard either, but I’ve had numerous pets

My bucket list included living without regrets, always taking a second chance, and learning to forgive. Now that I’m officially retired, my bucket list is shorter, and so is life.
Below are two highlights I crossed off my bucket list.

Olive Ridley Turtle Arribada  This Olive Ridley is burying her eggs in a downpour.

Monarch butterfly sanctuary near Ocampo, Mexico.

If you were a butterfly for a day, what would you put on your bucket list?