My First Experience with Medicare


“One quarter of Medicare beneficiaries have five or more chronic conditions, sees an average of 13 physicians each year, and fills 50 prescriptions per year.”
― Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Prescription: A Disruptive Solution for Health Care

I went to see my eye doctor in Tennessee the other day. When the nurse entered my information into the electronic files, she asked me, “Are you sure you don’t take any medications?” I replied, “Yes. Nothing.”

She couldn’t get over the fact that I had no pre-existing conditions, took no prescription medications, and had no medical history other than my appendectomy and tonsillectomy, which were removed when I was a teenager.

“I have to put something in the spaces,” she commented. “Do you take any vitamins?”
“Once in a while I take glucosamine,” I replied. With almost a sigh of relief, she asked me how many milligrams and how often I took glucosamine. “You are the best and easiest patient I have ever had,” she said. “But, you aren’t normal.”

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Part Two: Let’s Get Real About Expat Health Insurance


“Both terrorism and insurance sell fear — and business is business” ― Liam McCurry, Terminal Policy

IMG_9465The greatest fear of mine is a slow, painful, and expensive death from a catastrophic illness or accident. Living abroad poses many health risks, especially living on a tropical island with limited access to quality health care. After a painful bout with Chikungunya, it became necessary to research our options for international health insurance.

I suppose there are pros to being uninsured in Nicaragua. Health care is cheaper. We don’t have to see a doctor to get antibiotics or other prescription medications. We can usually self-diagnose if the illness is small and uncomplicated. For serious illnesses, Vivian Pellas hospital and the new Militar hospital in Managua offer excellent care. But, without health insurance, a catastrophic illness or accident can be expensive.

I’ve written posts about the need to have emergency medical funds when living abroad. If an expat goes to Vivian Pellas for an emergency medical procedure, before anything happens…anything!  VP swipes your credit card. Do you know what your credit card limit is? How will you afford an emergency $16,000 stent or two?

Therefore, because of my fears and “business is business”…we purchased international health insurance. Part One covered our exploration into the world of international health insurance policies. Now….

             Welcome to the world of two happy, healthy insured expats!

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