Pondering Progress in Nicaragua


“The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”
― Franklin D. Roosevelt

Economic growth is one of the main factors in determining the progress of a country and its potential to satisfy the wants of individuals in their society. I am convinced Nicaragua has made significant progress in utilizing their abundance of natural resources to produce more efficient wind and solar energy. Technological development has played a role in Nicaragua to connect the population to the outside world through fiber optic internet cables. Ometepe Island public parks now have free wi-fi access due to a fiber optic cable strung under the lake from the mainland.

Yet, I wonder if all progress and advancements I see in Nicaragua truly benefit the majority of the people living below the poverty line. Are we adding to the abundance of the minority of Nicaraguans who have so much, and are we providing enough to the majority who have so little?

Last week I traveled to Managua for my regular check-up with my eye doctor. Arriving at the port in San Jorge, I noticed a new ferry, a desperately needed ferry because many people on Ometepe Island must travel to the mainland daily for work. This progress benefits everyone. And I have seen much growth in transportation with new airports, shuttles, taxis, and lots of cute tuk tuks that buzz around newly constructed roads like little mosquitoes.
The San Jorge port had a magnificent facelift. Restaurants, vendors, hotels, and major work on the sea walls benefits everyone, too.
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A Three-Hour Tour


Just sit right back and you’ll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip…I hummed that song for three hours on my flight from Ometepe Island to Managua, which was supposed to be a 20 minute flight.

IMG_0272I was a little concerned when I booked my flight online with La Costéna because it is usually $50 plus taxes for a one-way flight. This time it was $83. Why the increase in the cost? The flight schedule said the plane left at 2:45 and arrived in Managua at 3:05.

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International Human Rights Day in Nicaragua


“The rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened.”
― John F. Kennedy

December 10th is International Human Rights Day. In honor of this day, a great March Against the Nicaraguan Canal is scheduled in Managua. This year’s theme is Human Rights 365.

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Health Care for Expats in Nicaragua


 

 

One of the biggest challenges of living abroad is health care. When we opted for early retirement, we could have continued our group health insurance, but the cost of the insurance would have reduced our pension checks by half. Plus, when we retired, our health insurance was not accepted in Nicaragua. We are too young for Social Security and Medicare. Medicare is not accepted in Nicaragua either. At the time, our only option was to take a risk, self-diagnose, and live cautiously on our tropical island.

Fortunately, Hospital Metropolitano Vivian Pellas in Managua is committed to providing healthcare with international excellence. So, we made an appointment with Arlen Peres, the Medical Tourism Manager, called our faithful taxi driver, and visited the hospital to explore our insurance options.

                                                Arlen Peres, Medical Tourism Manager

Arlen met us in the lobby of the hospital and attended to us like newborn babies. She took us on a tour of the immaculately clean and modern hospital, answered all of our questions with the honesty and professionalism of a Supreme Court Judge, and spoke fluent English. Impressive!

She explained the two insurance plans for the hospital: the Silver Plan and the Gold Plan. When we were trying to decide which plan would be the best for us, she recommended the Silver Plan because it cost less and it would meet our needs until we are 65 years old.

                        The Silver Plan

We filled out the health insurance application for the Silver Plan. It was three pages of general health questions..all in Spanish, which Arlen patiently translated for us. Ron’s Silver Plan is $21 a month. Mine is $18 a month. We could pay monthly or annually. We chose to pay annually and we charged $468 on our credit card for a year of health insurance for both of us!

The Silver Plan offers discounts for emergency room services, medical and physical rehabilitation, laboratory diagnosis and tests, annual preventive health check-ups, intensive care, and operations. The discounts increase after 24 hours, 90 days, and 180 days of insurance coverage. The discounts range from 15% to 70% depending on how long one has had insurance coverage.

Next, we had to have blood tests and urine samples tested for health insurance coverage. Arlen sent us to the lobby where we waited for about 10 minutes while she set up the appointments.

                                                  Ron and one of our friends

                                              The reception desk in the lobby

Arlen returned and took us directly to the admittance booth, where we paid $25 each for all the laboratory tests. Then, she took us to the laboratory for our tests…no waiting! Top notch service! We went to the emergency room for general physicals: weight, height, blood pressure. While we were in the emergency room, Arlen toured us through the offices and operating rooms. They have a kidney dialysis room, where we heard soft music and the TV behind the closed-door. She said the kidney dialysis room is open 24 hours a day and is always busy. I don’t know why so many people in Nicaragua have kidney problems, but it is prevalent.

We met with the doctor for a few more questions and prodding and poking. Then, on to the cafeteria where we had lunch while we were waiting for the results of our lab tests. Thirty minutes later, after we had delicious cappuccinos and chicken burritos, we met Arlen in the lobby with our test results. The best news was that the test results indicated that we had no parasites. Ron had just completed a round of parasite pills because he had a bad bout with parasites the week before. I know the parasites were the result of him eating mangoes that dropped to the ground!

We were finished for the day! Our lab tests and physicals would be reviewed by the insurance director and we would be notified of our acceptance within a week. I have never encountered such personalized attention. Where in the states could one have a personal attendant, who tends to every health need? Not to mention immediate test results hand delivered the same day. Before we left, we asked Arlen how much each operation or procedure cost. She said, “Email me with the specific procedures and operations you may need and I’ll send you a list of the all-inclusive costs.” Can you believe that? No hidden costs? A list of all the costs of the procedures and operations? I’m amazed! Why can’t they do that in the states?

My expat friends from Granada went to Vivian Pellas hospital two weeks ago for their annual check-ups. While they were doing the stress test, they discovered that J had a serious heart blockage. They operated on him that evening and placed 2 stents in his heart. He did not have the hospital insurance, and he had to pay upfront for the operation. He charged $16,500 on his credit card for the total bill. His wife had the same operation seven years ago in the states. She only had 1 stent placed in her heart. Total cost for her? $50,000. What is wrong with the health care system in the states? I won’t rant here, but something is terribly wrong when the same operation costs 3 times as much in the states.

Vivian Pellas Hospital has a website, but when we checked for information, the website was outdated. I talked with Arlen about the website and she told me that someone had hacked into the website. They had to put up the old website until October when the new website will be completed. Here’s a link to the old website: Vivian Pellas

If you are an expat living in Nicaragua, or a potential expat, please feel free to contact me for more information about Vivian Pellas Hospital. Nicaragua is advancing daily in health care for expats. It is reassuring to know that excellent, affordable health care is available in Nicaragua.