Tale of Two Surgeries


Update December 2019:

On a sad note, we left Nicaragua mid July 2018 due to the Civic Rebellion that continues to this day. On a good note, I had to have another eye surgery and my doctor in the states said my Nicaraguan retina specialist had done a wonderful job with my last surgery. I wish I could tell him, but he fled to Costa Rica during the Rebellion as did most of the good surgeons and doctors.

 

“If I save my insight, I don’t attend to the weakness of my eyesight.” ~Socrates

 

For six months, I lived in a blurry world. Although it was difficult to attend to the visual world due to weakness of eyesight, I gained an accurate and deeper intuitive understanding of people, places, and things. Instead of relying on outsight, I gained a better appreciation of my world through insight. 

Since I had my first eye operation in the United States and my second eye operation in Nicaragua, I thought it would be interesting to compare the surgeries in two vastly different countries. Both surgeries were similar. I will try to withhold judgment, but I can guarantee that if you are concerned about having a delicate or major surgery in a developing country, I will put your worries at ease.

A Tale of Two Surgeries Through The insightful Observations of an Expat 

A look at my island from the taxi window as I was on my way to the hospital in Managua.

Surgery in the United States

1. Facility

The facility where I received my vitrectomy in the U.S. was modern with all of the latest equipment. Johnson City Eye Clinic Website

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Part One: Let’s Get Real about Health Insurance in Nicaragua


Ron in our tiny Moyogalpa hospital

Ron in our tiny Moyogalpa hospital

I was in the U.S. visiting my mother when I received a picture of Ron in our tiny Moyogalpa hospital. Robinson said, “Don’t worry, Debbie. We are all helping Ron.” What??? I was frantic with worry. See my post, Love in the Time of Cholera

Chances are greater if you live in Nicaragua, or are visiting for long-term, that you will contact a tropical disease. We have had Dengue, food poisoning, Chikungunya, and maybe Cholera ( it wasn’t specifically identified, but Ron had all of the symptoms). I had a severe UTI infection that could be resolved with antibiotics without a visit to the doctor or a need for a prescription. This is where Dr. Google comes in handy for self-diagnosis, but what about a catastrophic accident or a life-threatening illness?

This is going to be a long post and I will take you through our search for health insurance options in Nicaragua and/or worldwide. So, let’s get started.

Let’s Get Real About Health Insurance in Nicaragua

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