Who Says Good Fences Make Good Neighbors?


Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners, and necessity has made us allies. ~ John F. Kennedy

My news feed is filled with political articles about building impenetrable fences and walls. Robert Frost’s poem Mending Wall represents a very common sentiment among neighbors everywhere. “Good fences make good neighbors.” But, is this statement true?

Geography has made us neighbors to all the wandering cattle along our beach path. Living on a predominantly agricultural island, I have learned that fences here are built to keep the cattle, wandering pigs, and horses out…definitely not people. I prefer it that way.

I dislike impenetrable walls with electric fences and shards of sharp glass clinging to the tops of the walls like prisons. That’s one of the main reasons we chose to live in a rural area surrounded by gracious neighbors with whom we can share our lives.

I understand that human relationships need boundaries. Robert Frost’s poem is a metaphor for establishing one’s boundaries.  When boundaries are clear, human relationships prosper. But, we needed a new fence to keep out the cows who have no understanding of human nature.

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Economics has made us partners in building our fence.
Jose needed work, and we needed a strong young man to mix cement.

IMG_9114Even our youngest neighbor, Issac, pitched in to help us build our fence. That’s what good neighbors do in Nicaragua.

IMG_9110Necessity has made us allies in Nicaragua. Let’s face it. Without the help of our neighbors, we would be lost. I do not have a green thumb. Marina knows that. The other evening, Marina and her father planted flowers in my flower bed in front of our house. Early the next morning, Marina stretched her hose across our property line and watered the newly planted flowers…and they bloomed! That’s what a good neighbor does.  Continue reading

Weekly Photo Challenge: Our Fruit From Every Angle


The Weekly Photo Challenge is From Every Angle. Our fruit is growing and falling from every angle on Ometepe Island. It pings, smashes, bounces, and crashes to the ground. It twists, climbs, and sways in the wind.

Our nancites are ripe and ping to the ground every few seconds. The neighborhood kids bring their buckets and scoop up the marble size fruit to eat it like candy.

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Renewing U.S. Passports from Nicaragua


Ron and I had no blank pages left in our passports. That’s the price one pays because of the love of travel. We had two options: either get extra passport pages in our passports before December 2015, or renew our passports.

The cost of a packet of extra pages for our passports was $82. The cost of renewing our passports and getting new ones was $110 at the U.S. Embassy in Nicaragua. It was a no-brainer for us and cheaper in the long-run because our passports could be renewed for ten more years.

Why are extra passport pages going away?

Being curious, I wondered how our U.S. Passports are made.

 

U.S. Passport facts at a glance.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Some Days You Just Gotta Laugh


The Weekly Photo Challenge is: Today Was a Good Day.

Although the WordPress gang wanted us to try their new Mesh program for a gallery of our photos, it was so frustrating that I gave up and instead found photos that made me laugh today.

You never know what you will find on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua.  The photos prove that in the land of the not quite right, you gotta laugh.  These photos were taken last week. So, for your entertainment today, I hope you have a few chuckles after viewing my photos.

How do you entertain the taxi driver’s two children on a long ride to Managua? You take goofy photos with your iPad.
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Service Learning and the La Paloma Library


“If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.” ~ Milton Berle

In my case, change the word “door” to “a library.” I don’t think I’ve ever mentioned how we first encountered Nicaragua. In 2003, my husband, son, and I delivered over 500 pounds of school supplies to an impoverished school in Granada. I found the need on the Lonely Planet forum when I was searching for an international service learning project to do with my high school classes.

Service Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enhance the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. Learn and Serve America Fact Sheet

I am trained as a service learning instructor and have completed many service learning projects with a variety of age groups. We built playgrounds, water fountains, picnic tables, painted school cafeterias, and then, I branched out internationally to help a school in Nicaragua.

So, when I received an email from Go For Hope/Supporting Community Libraries in Nicaragua, and they were bringing a service learning group to Ometepe Island, it was another serendipitous moment. I had asked for some help, and they arrived with paint brushes in hand and a willingness to spread the love of reading to my little elementary school library.

Joe Hafner organized the service learning group. When they arrived, we were ready for them to begin two days of fun in our little library.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Creepy Nicaragua


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Creepy.

There are some masks, clowns, baby dolls, and critters that really creep me out in Nicaragua.

Don Cabo has some creepy masks he uses to entertain tourists.
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Best 2,300 Travel Blogs on Internet


“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”
― Augustine of Hippo

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 9.16.45 PMI am happy to announce that my blog is included in the 2,300 Top Travel blogs on the internet. It is listed in Part 3: Regional Travel Blogs, under Nicaragua.

Check out the list. Many of my blogging friends have blogs listed, too.

List of Top 2300 Travel Blogs on the Internet

How many pages of the world have you opened in your travel book?

Master Craftsmen in Nicaragua


 “You can either be a victim of the world or an adventurer in search of treasure. It all depends on how you view your life.”
― Paulo Coelho, Eleven Minutes

I am an adventurer always in search of treasure. The Pre-Columbian pottery shards and pieces I find on my daily walks along the beach sit in piles on my bookcase and on my porch forever gathering dirt and dust and harboring tiny colonies of insects. Yet, more than protecting my pottery, I found a greater treasure in the master craftsmen in Nicaragua.

The time was long overdue to protect my treasures! I designed a wooden display cabinet, then I had to find a master woodworker to build the cabinet to my specifications. Marina recommended Herman, her door maker. When I saw the quality of his work, I knew he would be perfect.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Beneath My Feet in Nicaragua


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Beneath Your Feet.

Well, the good news is that I am posting pictures of beautiful things I find beneath my feet in Nicaragua. I could be posting photos of cow manure, dead squished Cane toads, blown-out flip-flops, or the pink and green plastic bags ( Nicaraguan flowers) all over the roads. Instead, I choose to overlook the trash and emphasize the beauty. :-)

A board walk under my feet on Corn Island, Nicaragua.
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Let’s Get Real about Time Management in Nicaragua


All that really belongs to us is time; even he who has nothing else has that. ~Baltasar Gracian

Living in Nicaragua requires a different mindset of time management. I used to pride myself in the ability to plan and control how I spent the hours in my day to effectively accomplish my goals. I had mastered the skills of planning for the future. setting goals, prioritizing tasks, and monitoring where the time goes. THEN…I moved to Nicaragua where mañana could mean today, tomorrow, sometime in the distant future, or never… where I am constantly reminded to slow down and be present. What I’ve learned about time management in Nicaragua may surprise you. It’s not all bad.

Let’s get real about time management in Nicaragua.

How many times have you been left hanging?

How many times have you been left hanging?

 

1. Most Nicaraguans are better at single-tasking, than multi-tasking.

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