Best 2,300 Travel Blogs on Internet


“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”
― Augustine of Hippo

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 9.16.45 PMI am happy to announce that my blog is included in the 2,300 Top Travel blogs on the internet. It is listed in Part 3: Regional Travel Blogs, under Nicaragua.

Check out the list. Many of my blogging friends have blogs listed, too.

List of Top 2300 Travel Blogs on the Internet

How many pages of the world have you opened in your travel book?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Beneath My Feet in Nicaragua


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Beneath Your Feet.

Well, the good news is that I am posting pictures of beautiful things I find beneath my feet in Nicaragua. I could be posting photos of cow manure, dead squished Cane toads, blown-out flip-flops, or the pink and green plastic bags ( Nicaraguan flowers) all over the roads. Instead, I choose to overlook the trash and emphasize the beauty. :-)

A board walk under my feet on Corn Island, Nicaragua.
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Let’s Get Real about Time Management in Nicaragua


All that really belongs to us is time; even he who has nothing else has that. ~Baltasar Gracian

Living in Nicaragua requires a different mindset of time management. I used to pride myself in the ability to plan and control how I spent the hours in my day to effectively accomplish my goals. I had mastered the skills of planning for the future. setting goals, prioritizing tasks, and monitoring where the time goes. THEN…I moved to Nicaragua where mañana could mean today, tomorrow, sometime in the distant future, or never… where I am constantly reminded to slow down and be present. What I’ve learned about time management in Nicaragua may surprise you. It’s not all bad.

Let’s get real about time management in Nicaragua.

How many times have you been left hanging?

How many times have you been left hanging?

 

1. Most Nicaraguans are better at single-tasking, than multi-tasking.

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My Obituary for Pierre Doris Maltais


Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 7.50.11 AM Pierre Doris Maltais was born June 27, 1937 in East Angus Quebec, married in 1961, and had three children. He died in July, 2015 in Granada, Nicaragua.

Known to many as Norman William, Brother Maolinn Tiam, Man, Abi, Indio, and numerous other aliases, he was revered by unsuspecting victims and followers of the Cult Ecoovie, and hated by those who were knowledgeable of his evil past.

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Let’s Get Real About Personal Space in Nicaragua


Four airplanes arrived in Nicaragua on the same day and at the same time. We were standing in an unusually long, disorganized line in customs. There was a small space in front of me…enough space for the man’s backpack to rest on the floor. Suddenly, a family of Nicaraguans rushed into the space in front of me. I glared at them and pointed to where the line ended. Yet, they didn’t move. I think they were trying to tell me, “My happy place is in your personal space.”

Cultural space: The final frontier. Invisible bubbles of space surround all of us and they vary according to the norms of the places where we live. Why do we have personal space issues and how do they differ from Nicaragua?

me on chicken bus

Me holding a stranger’s baby on a crowded chicken bus.

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Lessons Learned about Legal Taxi Drivers in Nicaragua


IMG_8390Returning to San Jorge from Granada last week, I had an interesting conversation with my taxi driver. We were stopped by the traffic police in order to check the taxi driver’s legal documents.

“Are you worried when the police stop you?” I asked.

“Not at all,” he responded. “Everything is legal and correct.”

A friend, visiting Nicaragua for the first time, arrived in Rivas on a chicken bus. She needed a taxi to San Jorge to catch the ferry…about a five-minute ride. She told me that she paid $20 for the taxi ride from Rivas to San Jorge. I was furious because a colectivo ( a taxi that takes numerous people around the Rivas area ) charges 20 cords per person. An expreso ( a taxi that takes only one person to San Jorge from Rivas) charges 100 cords.

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The Start of Something Big


IMG_5343My former fifth grade student is visiting Nicaragua for the first time. On her 19th birthday, we took her to Charco Verde to see the monkeys. Returning home in the taxi, we had a flat tire. I couldn’t help but laugh at the taxi driver’s t-shirt. The Start of Something Big
His t-shirt says it all about living in Nicaragua.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: On the Way Home


The Weekly Photo Challenge is On the Way. We’ve just returned from the USA…a wonderful visit with family and friends, but it is always GREAT to return home.

There are two ways to return to our Ometepe Island home. Sometimes we fly and walk to our house from the airport, but because we were returning with over 200 pounds of books and materials for my elementary school library, we took the ferry.

We usually see unusual things on our way home, but this was really unique. A circus was in town and the trainer took the elephant to the lake for a bath.
elephant in Lake

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Dem Broken Bones


The Weekly Photo Challenge is broken.

We are passionate about travel…always have been…always will be. I’m back in the states digitizing my photos and I found the perfect photos to represent broken. While roaming through Portugal, we discovered the Capela dos Ossos ( Chapel of Bones) in Évora.

This small chapel was built in the 16th century by a Franciscan monk, who wanted to send the message that life is transitory. A broken skeleton dangles near the entrance, reminding all who enter that “Better is the day of death, than the day of birth.”

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Weekly Photo Challenge: A Motion Filled Walk on Corn Island


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Motion. Join me in a windy motion filled walk on Corn Island.

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair.” ~Kalil Gibran, The Prophet
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“Words are wind.” George R.R. Martin
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