Airbnb Hospitality Around the World


“Whenever you go on a trip to visit foreign lands or distant places, remember that they are all someone’s home and backyard.”
― Vera Nazarian

If you follow my blog, you know that we are passionate travelers. However, the older we get, we find that our travels center more around Airbnbs. We used to be hostel and camper travelers and moved quickly from one location to another…but those days are gone. Now, we travel slowly centering our travels in an Airbnb for a week and take day trips from that location.

We love Airbnbs! They offer more space for less price, kitchens, and better amenities. They are generally in local neighborhoods, rather than tourist areas where the hotels are, so they are authentically fun. The property owners offer wonderful hospitality and since they live in the area, they can offer off-the-beaten track recommendations for restaurants and activities.  Plus, the wi-fi is free and fast.

We even thought we would sell our home on Ometepe Island and live in Airbnbs around the world like this couple...Airbnb: Retired Couple Travels World, Spends 1000 Nights in Airbnbs. 

Meanwhile, until we decide whether to make the BIG move, we are planning our next trip to Uruguay and Argentina…and of course centering our day trips around Airbnbs.

Some of our favorite Airbnbs around the world…

Cuenca, Ecuador. 

Juan’s place was in the center of the historic district of Cuenca. We were surrounded by gorgeous cathedral domes that lit up at night casting a blue hue into our windows. We ran out of propane for cooking, and Juan delivered a new bottle to us within an hour.

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My Love Affair with International Markets


Everywhere we travel, the first thing I look for is the local market. Local markets are bursting with heritage breeds and heirloom varieties of vegetables, fruits and other mysterious food items known only to the locals. Walking through a local market helps me to connect with the community’s roots.

Patzcuaro, Mexico had an open air market bursting with everything imaginable. Join me in a walk through the market. Fruits galore! We found many of the same fruits that we have in Nicaragua, only slightly different varieties such as the mangoes. Fresh strawberries…mounds and hills of them all over the market. It was such a treat to buy fresh strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries daily.

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Wanderlust: A belly aching fire


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Wanderlust.

I know some of my readers wonder why I include posts about our travels to other countries besides Nicaragua. After all, my blog is supposed to be about living in Nicaragua.

Yet, my gypsytoes ache for travel. Because we live in a country where the cost of living is low, we can afford to travel, especially during the most brutal and oppressive heat of March through May.

Currently, we are in the mountains in Patzcuaro, Mexico. We were in Cuba in March and are headed to the states next week for the month of May. No matter where our wanderlust takes us, it is always great to go back home!

“The Wanderlust has got me… by the belly aching fire”
― Robert W. Service, Rhymes of a Rolling Stone

Cuba

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Living on the Edge


“And God said come to the edge.” “I can’t. I’m afraid.” “Come to the edge.” “I can’t. I’ll fall” “Come to the edge.” I went to the edge and God pushed me…….and I flew.”― Guillaume Apollinaire

 
The Weekly Photo Challenge is Edge.

My family and I live on the edge. And when we come to the edge…we jump. The edge is just the beginning of our lives, jumping into the unknown is the adventure.

At the peak of the Swiss Alps without our high-heeled shoes!
img_8197On the brink of discovery in a Brazilian cave.
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The Island of Pepes


“Even the ocean waves take their hellos to the people all the time. I should take my hellos down to the beach and sell waves to the tourists.”
― Jarod Kintz

 

After exploring the most touristy places in Cartagena, Colombia, we wanted to visit a place that was tranquil and similar to our home island, Ometepe, Nicaragua. We researched Tierra Bomba and according to the history and reviews of this island, it appeared to be the best place to escape the crowds.

Tierra Bomba is described as a forgotten island, although it is only 15 minutes away from Cartagena by boat. On Tierra Bomba there are about 9,000 residents who make a living from tourism and fishing. It is not a typical destination for tourists. Perfect for us!

IMG_0409Anthony Bourdain loved this island. He used words like tranquil and far from the maddening crowds as he ate a delicious lobster lunch in a small rancho by the sea. Yep! We were going to go to Tierra Bomba for a day of relaxation, fun in the sun, and mouth-watering lobster.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Future Thoughts from My Mother


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Future.

This is what I learned about the future from my mother…with quotes and my photos from Cartagena, Colombia.

When I was young, I ate breakfast with my mother and we would share our dreams of the night before. Our colorful dreams were usually joyful and telltale of our outlooks on life.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”
― Eleanor Roosevelt
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Blending Old and New Landscapes in Cartagena


“The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” ~ Socrates

The Weekly Photo Challenge is Landscape.

Cartagena, Colombia is a perfect blend of old and new. Known for 6.8 miles of protective walls built around the city, the historic center or Old Town is the soul of Cartagena.
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Weekly Photo Challenge: The Half-Light of Cartagena


The Weekly Photo Challenge is half-light.

We recently returned from Cartagena, Colombia. During our trip, we visited Tierra Bomba Island, a short 15 minute boat ride from the skyscrapers of Cartagena. I call it the island of Pepes because everyone we met was named Pepe. Stay tuned for our wild experience on the Island of Pepes. Meanwhile enjoy my haiku and photo of Cartagena’s skyscrapers bathed in half-light.

                                                  The world shines half-light
                                                      defining Cartagena
                                                    dimming skyscrapers

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Stories Behind the Street Art of Getsemaní


“Art is an evolutionary act. The shape of art and its role in society is constantly changing. At no point is art static. There are no rules.”
― Raymond Salvatore Harmon, BOMB: A Manifesto of Art Terrorism

Getsemaní used to be known for drugs and crime, and was far from the cultural epicenter of Cartagena, Colombia that it now represents. Getsemaní has emerged from a complicated past and evolved into a burgeoning barrio complete with a live music scene and an artistic community spirit.

Recently with revitalization, this once seedy neighborhood has become the coolest, most authentic, and colorful part of Cartagena. These murals represent new issues that are plaguing Getsemani, such as racial segregation, gentrification and increasing tourism. I was in photographer’s heaven. Join me as we roam the vibrant street art of Getsemaní while the art unveils itself.

IMG_1159Amazing portrait of a homeless man who sleeps on the sidewalk below this wall.
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