We Must Be Living in a Vortex!


“I hate to say this,” said my attorney as we sat down at the Merry-Go-Round Bar on the second balcony, “but this place is getting to me. I think I’m getting the Fear.””Nonsense,” I said. “We came here to find the American Dream, and now that we’re right in the vortex you want to quit.” I grabbed his bicep and squeezed. “You must realize,” I said, “that we’ve found the main nerve.””I know,” he said. “That’s what gives me the Fear.”

Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Chapter 6, A Night on the Town…p. 47-48

I think I’m getting the Fear. Last night there was a 7.3 magnitude earthquake in northern Nicaragua, near the border of El Salvador. My cat, Queenie, tried to warn me. I’ve heard that animals are sensitive to movements of the earth. Queenie was exceptionally persistent in rubbing against me and kneading my belly. I thought she just wanted fed.

“What’s wrong with you tonight?” I asked as she dug her sharp claws into my stomach. “Do you miss your brother, Black Jack?”

Earthquake ahead!

What Really Matters?


“As one old gentleman put it,  “Son, I don’t care if you’re stark nekkid and wear a bone in your nose. If you kin fiddle, you’re all right with me. It’s the music we make that counts.”
― Robert Fulghum, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

 

I am ready to make some music…either that or get stark nekkid and wear a bone in my nose.  We’ve been home a week, and in that time…

  • Our cat, Black Jack, almost died from a urinary track blockage.
  • The police confiscated my new-to-me little orange dune buggy, took it for a joy ride and crashed it.
  • Our lawyer said we have a problem with the title to our property on Ometepe Island…which always involves lots of money.
  • The city put in a new high pressure pump and it blew out some of our water-lines.
  • Ocho, our other cat, was AWOL for five days.
  • The Chinese are measuring property near our new airport for a resort. WE LIVE NEAR THE AIRPORT!  I think it goes along with their plan for the proposed Nicaraguan canal.
  • The library at our local elementary school is ready for me to set-up. HHI wants to return to film us for the library’s grand opening in their new show, HHI, Where Are They Now?
  • And…and…I’m sick. It must be stress related.

So, I have to ask myself…What really matters? If I don’t, you’ll probably find me stark nekkid, running around my yard with a bone in my nose.

Read more to find what really matters to me.

Driving Ms. Debbie


“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.”
― Lao Tzu

Life is a trip in the land of the not quite right (Nicaragua). I’m learning to expect the unexpected and let reality be reality.  But, occasionally things happen that are so unforeseen, that the only thing to do is let things flow naturally forward in whatever bizarre way they like. It’s the only way to survive in Nicaragua!

Robinson and I went to Granada yesterday to pick-up my new-to-me Scartt dune buggy. I’ve lived in Nicaragua long enough to know that our two-hour drive back to the port to catch the ferry with my conspicuous orange machine would draw a lot of attention….especially from the police.  So, Robinson drove “Ms. Debbie” to the amusement of every trucker, bicycler, cowboy, and vendor along the way.

IMG_4846 The adventure has only begun. Wait until you read what happens next!

Travel Theme: Merchandise


“I was part of that strange race of people aptly described as spending their lives doing things they detest, to make money they don’t want, to buy things they don’t need, to impress people they don’t like.”
― Emile Gauvreau

Then. I. Jumped.

Life is simple now. I buy little recycled plastic bottle flowers made by local school kids to fund their school projects.

IMG_3437

More merchandise ahead. Keep reading.

Everything You Need to Know about Death of an Expat in Nicaragua


The information contained in this post is specific to all foreigners and expats living in Nicaragua. It was the easiest way for me to disseminate this important information. After writing an article for the Nicaragua Dispatch, Does Death Become You as an Expat?  I organized a meeting in Granada with representatives of Vivian Pellas Hospital, the U.S. Embassy representative, lawyers from Nicaragua, and other U.S. Embassy wardens.

My hope is that this valuable information can be disseminated throughout Nicaragua. Each region of Nicaragua will have specific needs about issues of death and palliative care. Please disseminate this information to your region.
Continue reading if you want to learn everything about death of an expat in Nicaragua.

Love in the Time of Cholera?


“His examination revealed that he had no fever, no pain anywhere, and that his only concrete feeling was an urgent desire to die. All that was needed was shrewd questioning…to conclude once again that the symptoms of love were the same as those of cholera.”
― Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera

When I was visiting my mother in the states, my neighbor, Julio, posted this photo of our puppy on Facebook. He said, “Don’t worry, Debbie. I’ll take care of Capie for you while Ron is in the hospital.”

                                           Where are my mommy and daddy?
Capie copy Did Ron have Cholera? Read on to find out.

Does Death Become You as an Expat?


              “None of us are getting out of here alive.” ~ R. Alan Woods

IMG_5748If you are an expat or consider becoming an expat, I’ve written an article called, Does Death Become You as an Expat? for the Nicaragua Dispatch. With an increasingly older population of expats retiring in Nicaragua, planning for an emergency or possible death abroad is vital.

I have a friend who had to return to the United States because palliative care was not an option in Nicaragua. I’d like to network with a hospice program that provides hospice or palliative care abroad. If you are familiar with a program and have information on how to start one in Nicaragua, please let me know. Let’s help to make death dignified and compassionate abroad. After all, none of us are getting out of here alive. :-)

Other articles I’ve written:
Marina and Socialized Medicine In Nicaragua
Helplessly Mute: A Trip to the Dentist
Expats and Obamacare for Los Idiotas
Health Care for Expats in Nicaragua
No Family Left Behind

House Sitter Haven


IMG_3589We were very fortunate to find Max and Alize to housesit for us when we traveled for a month through Ecuador. Max is from Canada and Alize is from Belgium. They were housesitting in Leon, Nicaragua and posted on a Facebook page for expats in Nicaragua that they were looking for a housesitting gig for a month. They’ve been on the road four years, working online to provide income for their travels.

Keep reading.More tips on choosing housesitters.

Anchored to La Isla


“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.”
― Augustine of Hippo

IMG_2027One of the main reasons we retired to Nicaragua is because it is centrally located and only a two-hour flight to Miami. Our original plan was to build a house on Ometepe Island and use it as a home base allowing us the freedom to travel the world and return to our inexpensive boomer nest when our gypsytoes ached for the comforts of home.
Can we cut the umbilical cord? Read on to find out.

Travel Theme: Ready, Set, Glow!


Where’s my backpack? has a weekly travel theme. This week’s travel theme is GLOW and I have the perfect piece for this theme.

El Cerro Negro volcano in Northern Nicaragua is one of Central America’s youngest volcanoes. He ( Spanish El means a masculine volcano) was born in April 1850 and continues to be one of Nicaragua’s most active volcanoes. Currently his status is “restless”. His last major eruption was in 1999.
Eruption Cerro Negro

More glowing photos. Keep reading.