Let the Good Times Roll?


“No one has ever become poor by giving.”
― Anne Frank, diary of Anne Frank

 

let the good times rollRecently, I’ve been bombarded on my Facebook news feed with videos of the ALS Ice Bucket challenge. The ALS marketing strategy is brilliant and has raised over $30 million dollars for ALS research and created an awareness of ALS throughout the world. Letting the good times roll by donating to a reputable charity AND having fun while doing it is exhilarating.
Keep rolling. More good times ahead.

The Nicaraguan Canal: Digging with a Needle


 “Getting money is like digging with a needle, spending it is like water soaking into sand.” ~Japanese Proverb.

          The Proposed Route of the Nicaraguan Canal

canal route copy
I may be naïve, but I subscribe to the idea that nobody is making strategic decisions about the Nicaraguan Canal Project. I’ve followed the Nicaraguan Canal Project for two years, now. The talk is grand, but the transparency surrounding the canal is nonexistent.

Keep reading.There’s a great video ahead.

Tell the World


The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow. ~Bill Gates

 

IMG_3800Two weeks ago, we had a microwave internet tower installed. We spent the last four years, struggling with a Claro modem stick which provided slow, inconsistent, and sometimes nonexistent service. Now, our internet speed is fast enough to stream video and watch Netflix movies and my favorite series, Orange is the New Black.
I’m telling the world. Read more.

Part Two: The Gift of Reading


“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”
― Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!

 

C. S. Lewis said, “We read to know that we are not alone.”  Red Oak Elementary School students in Shakopee, Minnesota understand this need, and are graciously sharing their lives and their joy of reading with my tiny La Paloma Elementary School on Ometepe Island.

Keep reading. There’s more.

Two Kids from La Chureca Looking For Sponsors


Rewired and Retired in Nicaragua:

Jefferson is a Weekend Philanthropist and he is looking for sponsors for two children in Nicaragua. If you are interested in sponsoring one or both of these children, please contact him.

Originally posted on The Weekend Philanthropist:

For the past year, my mom and I have sponsored two children from La Chureca, paying so they could go to a private school outside of the landfill.

The kids worked hard, but private school is difficult and there has been a lot of change going on around them, including the community being moved to concrete homes together with people from other extremely poor areas of Managua.

This year, our scholarship director in Nicaragua, a nurse who has been serving the people of La Chureca for over a decade and who volunteers her time to help administer these scholarships, has two more children who she thinks are up for the challenge of private school – all they need is the funding.

Benefits of private school over public school:

  1. Smaller class sizes.
  2. Higher discipline.
  3. Access to a psychologist, a library, and a computer lab.
  4. Incentives to be the best…

View original 226 more words

Weekly Photo Challenge: What is This Object?


The Weekly Photo Challenge is Object.  Our photographs tell stories, big and small.”
My mother often made things for our Nicaraguan neighborhood. She made beautiful aprons embroidered with roosters, embroidered dish towels, and quilted purses for my local friends. Each time I delivered my gifts, my gracious local friends would give my mother a handmade gift in return. This crocheted gift had us puzzled, until we figured out its use. We laughed until we cried. Do you know what this object is?

For this weekly photo challenge, it’s not the photography that counts, but the story behind it. :-)

                                Pay it forward! It’s the thought that counts.

Guess what this is

Women’s Soccer in Nicaragua


“Soccer isn’t the same as Bach or Buddhism. But it is often more deeply felt than religion, and just as much a part of the community’s fabric, a repository of traditions.”
― Franklin Foer, How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

Las Divinas de Los Ramos

Las Divinas de Los Ramos

This year, the indigenous community of Los Ramos on Ometepe Island started a women’s soccer team. Twenty-two young women ages 12-31 joined Las Divinas. And, oh how divine this team is! Their lack of uniforms, soccer shoes, and proper equipment didn’t hold them back. They ran in bare feet and practiced with a homemade goal constructed with a large PVC pipe, while onlookers held their babies and cheered for this determined group of women.

Sports, in general, are great motivators to help people around the world to connect with one another and become united. The community of Los Ramos recognizes the potential for soccer to help improve their young women’s lives through fostering teamwork, teaching the importance of hard work, dedication, and cooperation with others. They believe that the humble beginnings of The Divine Women’s Soccer team can effect positive social change in their community, as well as play an important role in the fight for gender equality in Nicaragua.

I would like to help this team buy uniforms and equipment for their next soccer season. With your donations, we can help them fulfill their dreams of a brighter and divine future for women in the Los Ramos community.  They have compiled a list of needed items, the costs, and where they will buy their uniforms. Any extra money received, once the goal is met, will go to purchase soccer balls, nets, and other equipment these deserving young women will need.

Here is the YouCaring donation page: The Divine Women’s Soccer Team

All donations will go directly to The Divine Women’s Soccer team. I’ll be sure to update you with pictures, team scores, and profiles of some of the women that you have supported. Thank you so much in advance for your generosity.

A little information about Nicaraguans and the internet:
The soccer coach visited my home several times, and gave me a carefully compiled list of what they need, the costs, and the places where they will buy the soccer uniforms and equipment. He also compiled a list of all the women, their ages, and showed me all of their identification cards. Then he said, “Can you put this on the internet for us?” I silently chucked to myself because they don’t understand how the internet works. It’s a mysterious miracle to them. In exchange for a bag of beans, two watermelons, and lots of hugs and thank yous, I said, “I will be glad to put your soccer team on the internet for you.”

Women’s Soccer Exchange
Our Women’s Soccer Team
Soccer Without Borders in Nicaragua

The Sky’s the Limit


“Do mistakes and you become a good learner.
Welcome ordeals and you become a good problem solver.”~ Riddhi Sharma

Our SKY satellite TV has been on the blink for a month. Poor Ron! He can’t watch the football games on Sunday and I really miss CNN. Playing detective is a necessary part of life on Ometepe Island. We cut branches of trees close to the satellite dish, checked the cable for tears or scrapes, jiggled the dish, wiggled the wires, and rewired the service box…all to no avail.
The only service technicians in the entire country are from Managua, so we called and put in a work order for them to come to Ometepe to fix our TV. Yesterday, they arrived with the SKY truck.
IMG_0611For two hours they jiggled the cable, repositioned the satellite dish, and checked the service box, while the annoying beeping from the TV indicated that there was no signal.
IMG_0612They moved the satellite dish to a wiggly garden post in the hopes of solving the mystery about why there was no signal.
IMG_0619Hmmm…suddenly the signal was strong and clear. It must be the Neem tree blocking the signal. Three years ago, when we installed the satellite dish, our Neem trees were only a foot tall. Now, they are 25 feet tall. I guess we have to take down the Neem tree. Ron to the rescue with his machete.
IMG_0616Meanwhile, as the sun was setting, Black Jack investigated the SKY truck.
IMG_0622With the tree down, the technicians put the dish back in its original location.
IMG_0623No worries. We still have five more Neem trees on our property.
IMG_0624He repositioned the dish for a strong, steady signal.
IMG_0625And voilà! A strong, steady signal…football games and CNN!
IMG_0627By this time, it was dark and the last ferry had already left for the mainland. “Where are you staying tonight?” I asked. “Can we stay here?” the boss asked. “No problemo!” I responded. I was a little embarrassed because the only problem with our satellite signal was the Neem tree. I felt bad that they had to travel a whole day from Managua, across on the ferry, to solve our problem. The boss wanted to know if there were other people on the island that would like SKY TV, since they were here. I quickly sent a notice to all the expats on the island and received 2 responses by the next morning.
IMG_0628What a great crew! They even offered me a job as the SKY representative for Ometepe Island. It was their first time on Ometepe Island. They slept in our casita, took a quick dip in the lake in the morning, and I gave them the phone numbers of the two expats that were interested in installing SKY in their homes.

The SKY’s the limit, as far as our satellite reception goes. Only in Nicaragua! Have I told you how much I love this country?